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Sunday, April 26, 2015

Creator of the cronut set to open towering bakery in Tokyo

Relaxnews

In this June 3, 2013 file photo, chef Dominique Ansel makes Cronuts, a croissant-donut hybrid, at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York. (Richard Drew / AP Photo)
In this June 3, 2013 file photo,
chef Dominique Ansel makes Cronuts, a croissant-donut hybrid,
at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York. (Richard Drew / AP Photo)
The French chef, who has been delighting New Yorkers with his cronuts since 2013, will open his first foreign outpost in the land of the rising sun. On June 20, a futuristic stand-alone tower in the business and fashion district of Shibuya will be dedicated exclusively to the bakery and all of the French chef's latest creations.

Dominique Ansel announced last September that he intended to bring a bit of New York and Paris to Tokyo. It'll be mission accomplished on June 20 with the opening of his latest outpost, a next generation bakery to transport the pastry wizard's confections into the future.

According to Line, the Japanese design studio Ansel trusted to bring this project to life, the launch zone will be a stand-alone three-story tower, a rare find in Tokyo where many retail spaces are located in enormous shopping malls.

A tower of delicacies

The ground floor, dedicated to retail, will be decorated in a design inspired by New York City and Paris subway stations. There, connoisseurs will be able to revel in Dominique Ansel's creations, including the famous cronut, a doughnut and croissant hybrid that orchestrates a delightful dance of flavors including lemon, raspberry and coconut.

At the rear of the first floor will be seating space beneath a custom work of art depicting a combination of the NYC subway and Paris metro lines. Instead of actual stops on the lines, though, customers will notice on one the names of the chefs that inspired Ansel, on another the various names of cronuts past, and on another some expressions and sayings from the chef's kitchens.

On the second floor is a café with table service where waiters will offer a menu different from the one downstairs. The menu's emphasis will be on eggs, in part because chef Ansel has been so impressed with the quality of the eggs in Japan.

The most curious will venture up to the third floor, where they will have the opportunity to see all of Ansel's tasty treats being prepared behind glass walls. And based on the fervor of the Japanese for the work of Pierre Hermé and the chocolates of Pierre Marcolini, you can expect that third floor to be crawling with visitors at all times.

This Japanese outpost will join the French pastry chef's growing network, which already includes the first store in New York's Soho and a second one opening not far away in the West Village at the end of the month.

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